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It’s here! Selena Gomez: My Mind & Me finally here!

For years, Selena Gomez has been inspiring fans. Not just with her acting and her phenomenal music, but with her positive messaging and transparency.

With her new Apple TV+ documentary film, she is taking that to the next level.

Selena is reliving her mental breakdown and her lowest points over a six-year journey.

On Friday, November 4, Selena Gomez: My Mind & Me launched on Apple TV+ for the world to see.

“I wish you could feel what it feels like to be in my head,” she expressed to viewers.

Alek Keshishian directed the project, which includes a view of the ups and downs of her life over six years. That includes her breakdown and hospitalization.

In 2016, Selena canceled her Revival Tour after 55 dates. She checked into a treatment facility for her mental health — a battle that stemmed from her lupus.

But the documentary shows us Selena’s actual breakdown after her dress rehearsal. She feels worn down. And at the mention of her infamous ex, Justin Bieber, she laments that their names are forever linked.

“When am I going to be just good enough by myself?” she asks. “When am I going to be good just myself, not needing anyone to be associated with?”

The world knew that Selena has lupus. But the pain of that health struggle had made her physically weak.

Then came the exhausting pressures of performing. By 2018, the documentary reveals, Selena was hearing voices. This led to an episode of clinical psychosis.

Friends and former assistants speak to the camera about how Selena’s condition frightened them. They didn’t know how long it would last. And they weren’t sure if she truly wanted to live, at times.

Selena’s own mother, Mandy, did not know about this at the time. She learned when TMZ called to ask her about it.

“They called me and wanted to know what my daughter was doing in the hospital with a nervous breakdown,” Mandy tells the cameras.

“She didn’t want anything to do with me,” she continues, “and I was scare she was going to die.”

Mandy Teefey
This is Mandy Teefey. She is the mother of Selena Gomez and she doesn’t like Justin Bieber very much.

In 2019, we see Selena after her stay in the hospital. She now has her diagnosis of bipolar disorder.

“I’m gonna be honest, I didn’t want to go to a mental health hospital,” she then admits.

“I didn’t want to,” Selena continues. “But I didn’t want to be trapped myself in my mind anymore.”

“That’s why I say to my people that are the greatest friends and family especially my mom and my stepdad, Brian,” Selena expressed.

This is “because I shouldn’t have spoken to them the way that I did and it shouldn’t have treated them the way that I did some times…”

Selena admitted: “I remember certain things that I did. And I was really so mean. And so even to this day, I keep saying thank you and I’m sorry.”

Gomez, Selena Photo
Selena Gomez looking as gorgeous as ever. Not that we’re surprised.

But getting a diagnosis and treatment for bipolar disorder is just part of her treatment, not the end of it.

Selena had her comeback album, Rare, in 2019. The same year, she took a trip to Kenya with the WE Foundation.

And, during the COVID-19 pandemic, Selena suffered a lupus relapse.

Selena Gomez Voted!
Selena Gomez voted! She bragged about that act via this Instagram photo in late 2020. But it’s 2022 now, and this is a great reminder to vote in the midterms!

Selena admitted to her close friends that she felt ready to leave behind her career. Even though millions love her for her talent and personality, it at times has not felt worth it.

“I want to quit so I can be happy and be normal like everyone else,” she confessed.

We do know that this is not the path that Selena chose. Instead, she has blown people away on Only Murders In The Building. And she continues to use her platform for good causes.

“I don’t want to be super famous, but if I’m here I have to use it for good,” Selena decides.

As we know, she is funneling money to underserved communities to help others with their mental health.

And Selena attended the inaugural White House Conversation on Youth Mental Health. The documentary itself is part of her outreach, too. People struggling as she has will know that they are not alone.