Funeral Selfies: Actually a Thing! With Their Own Tumblr!

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Funeral selfies, a phenomenon real enough that there's a Tumblr blog devoted to it, show that our society may have hit a new, self-absorbed low.

A collection of strangely un-sad Instagrams, Tweets, and Facebook posts have been gathered on a Tumblr blog (naturally) called "Selfies at Funerals."

'Cause after all, no moment in life, or death, is too serious or trivial to pass without posting a rapid, vapid response - or cute pic! - on social media.

"Love my hair today. Hate why I'm dressed up #funeral," reads the caption of a self-portrait snapped by a young woman dressed in black at a funeral.

"Killin the selfie game at pop's funeral," tweeted a joyful young man mocking a piece of statuary at the service (we wish we were making that up).

Another photo on the blog of a blonde girl pouting in a pink bedroom with a "Keep Calm and Rock On" sign is titled, simply, "depressing funeral selfie."

What's depressing is that people aren't even content with depression anymore.

If you're amazed at how much you're rockin' the outfit while a relative is in a coffin, the Kim Kardashian-ing of our society is complete. We are all in the exploitation business.

Or not? Katy Waldman at Slate offers a defense of funeral selfies:

"Is it somehow more tasteful, or nobler, to keep grief private? If that's the case, the problem with Internet mourning far predates the Internet."

"People have put sadness on display - wearing black, holding ceremonies - since the ancient Greeks first hired mourners to tear out their hair at funerals."

"Social media may make it easier to launch a stream of frown-y faces into the ether, but Mark Zuckerberg didn't invent the impulse to reach out when you're hurting."

An interesting point, but still, Instagram selfies at funerals?! Is nothing sacred? Are we so vain that this somehow seems like a vital part of daily life?

You tell us: Funeral selfies ...

 

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Grief IS a private thing. Simply because we have funerals does not make it public. Funerals are a source of closure. Where families and loved ones come to share their grief over losing someone dear to them, not a spectacle to which the public is invited. You don't crash a funeral. It's not a fun thing. You DON'T take photos at a funeral. It is a private ceremony for those that knew the deceased. But grief doesn't stop after the funeral. You grieve those people for the rest of your life. Is the public invited to that? Still, I answer no. I would argue that grief is a VERY private thing. Just because you share it with your family does not make it public. That being said, this is a disturbing trend. It's not respectful of or honoring the dead. It's vanity and nothing more. And it's disgusting.

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