Mayim Bialik Lashes Out at "Vicious" Critics, Totally Doesn't Get It

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Mayim Bialik is not apologizing for her controversial stance regarding rape and feminism.

Over the weekend, Bialik wrote an op-ed in response to accusations of sexual assault against movie producer Harvey Weinstein.

Mayim Bialik Poses

The Big Bang Theory actress was not a victim of Weinstein's. It doesn't sound as though she knows anyone who has claimed to be.

So why did she choose to speak out about this topic?

Because Bialik thought she had helpful advice to offer fellow members of her gender.

"As a proud feminist with little desire to diet, get plastic surgery or hire a personal trainer, I have almost no personal experience with men asking me to meetings in their hotel rooms," Bialik wrote, instantly stepping into scalding hot water.

Right off the bat here, she's saying that Weinstein only preyed on attractive women.

Moreover, she's blaming the attractive women for... well... being attractive.

She's completely missing the point that sexual harassment is all about some insecure jerk such as Weinstein exerting his power, not simply wanting to tap some fine piece of you-know-what.

"Those of us in Hollywood who don't represent an impossible standard of beauty have the 'luxury' of being overlooked and, in many cases, ignored by men in power unless we can make them money," Bialik continued.

Mayim Bialik on CBS

Over the past week or so, approximately 43 women have come forward and accused Weinstein of sexual misconduct.

Some, such as Rose McGowan, have accused him or rape.

The fact that anyone would dare to lecture these women, or any victims of assault, is horribly offensive.

But that never occurred to Bialik, apparently.

"If you are beautiful and sexy, terrific. But having others celebrate your physical beauty is not the way to lead a meaningful life," she wrote.

"And if - like me - you're not a perfect 10, know that there are people out there who will find you stunning, irresistible and worthy of attention, respect and love.

"The best part is you don't have to go to a hotel room or a casting couch to find them."

Mayim Bialik Snapshot

In response to this terribly pompous and totally misguided editorial, critics lambasted Bialik for blaming the victims of rape in any way, shape or form.

Gabrielle Union, for example, Tweeted that "Sexual or physical violence, harassment, demeaning language is NOT the price one should pay for seeking or maintaining employment. Period."

She then shared her personal story:

union

Care to respond, Mayim Bialik?

Actually, the actress has responded.

Not to Union, specifically, but to her critics.

"I’m being told my N.Y. Times piece resonated with so many and I am beyond grateful for all of the feedback,” she wrote on Twitter, adding:

“I also see a bunch of people have taken my words out of the context of the Hollywood machine and twisted them to imply that God forbid I would blame a woman for her assault based on her clothing or behavior.

"Anyone who knows me and my feminism knows that’s absurd and not at all what this piece was about.

"It’s so sad how vicious people are being when I basically live to make things better for women."

mayim tweet

The actress announced that she would hold a Facebook Live discussion with the newspaper on Monday to clear the air.

But we have a question, considering that Bialik wrote the following in her piece:

I am entirely aware that these types of choices might feel oppressive to many young feminists.

Women should be able to wear whatever they want. They should be able to flirt however they want with whomever they want. Why are we the ones who have to police our behavior?

In a perfect world, women should be free to act however they want.

But our world isn’t perfect.

Nothing—absolutely nothing—excuses men for assaulting or abusing women. But we can’t be naïve about the culture we live in.

How, exactly, are we taking anything out of context to interpret this as placing blame on sexual assault victims for how they dress and act?

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