Orson Scott Card, Ender's Game Author, Under Fire for Gay Marriage Views

by at . Comments

Ender's Game opens November 1 (you can check out the Ender's Game trailer here) and nerds the world over are waiting with bated breath.

However, with that excitement comes a bit of moral trepidation for some.

Ender's Game Image

Orson Scott Card, author of the novel the movie is based upon, has been very vocal in his opposition of gay marriage. Extremely vocal. Hard to miss vocal.

Understandably, there has been backlash against this. 

Supporters of gay marriage, including the group Geeks OUT, have called for a boycott of the new film, not unlike the Chick-Fil-A boycott last year.

So what's a nerd to do?

Do you boycott the film over Orson Scott Card's views? Do you take into consideration how many people's jobs and livelihood are connected to the success of the film?

Perhaps you don't boycott at all because it's not like Card is personally involved in the project beyond writing the novel it's based on. Wait, what if the success of the film then causes more people to go out and purchase the novel which then does directly benefit Card?

Dilemma.

Well Mr. Card himself is offering an "out" per se. In a statement he gave Entertainment Weekly he says, "With the recent Supreme Court ruling, the gay marriage issue becomes moot."

Okay, he's got a point. Doesn't take back the not so kind things he's said but he's got a point. The Supreme Court win does make the issue a non-issue as far the legality of gay marriage is concerned. If Orson Scott Card has stopped there, I myself would feel much more at ease with supporting the film. 

But he didn't.

Card goes on, "Now it will be interesting to see whether the victorious proponents of gay marriage will show tolerance toward those who disagreed with them when the issue was still in dispute."

Now, the internet lacks a sarcasm font but I'm getting strong feelings that this is a loaded statement. Instead of just leaving it with, "hey, it's a non-issue now so let's just move on" Card feels the need to make sure that everyone knows he thinks that those who still boycott his film are being hypocritical.

His opinion on the matter has not changed, he still feels the same way he did before the ruling but because "they" won, everything should start over. 

So, what say you readers? Does a Supreme Court victory make way for guiltless viewing? Or do Card's words carry over no matter what the outcome of the legal fight was? 

Tags: , , , ,