Kaley Cuoco Responds to Anti-Pit Bull Article: They're The Greatest Dogs in The World!

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Before Kaley Cuoco married Ryan Sweeting, the actress says she warned her husband-to-be that she has several other loves in her life: her three rescue pit bulls.

Keley Cuoco and Norman

Her affection for her dogs led Kaley to respond on Twitter yesterday to a Time magazine article detailing the scars and and injuries suffered by a 3-year-old girl following a horrific pit bull attack:

"Many of u asked if I read the Time magazine article about 'killer pit bulls,'" Cuoco tweeted. "I just did. I have to take a Twitter break. I can't stomach this anymore."

The Time article stemmed from an incident in Jackson, MS, in which a woman was asked to escort her granddaughter from a KFC restaurant, as the young girl's facial scarring and eye patch were bothering the other patrons.

The article cited some alarming statistics about the breed, including the facts that pit bulls account for 68 percent of all dog attacks and 52 percent of all dog-related deaths.

Kaley has yet to refute the specific claims made by Time, but speaking about pit bulls during a recent appearance on Ellen, Cuoco remarked, "I love them. They're the greatest dogs in the world."

Kaley spoke about her desire to have children recently, but has not stated whether she plans to continue to raise pit bulls in her home once she has a baby.

Kaley Cuoco Bikini Photo
The world's hottest Kaley Cuoco bikini photo. Which is saying a lot.

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and last, but not least:
http://nationalcanineresearchc... Observers Don’t Agree on Breed Identifications

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http://nationalcanineresearchc... 1. WHAT IS BREED-SPECIFIC LEGISLATION?
2. WHAT BREEDS OF DOGS HAVE BEEN TARGETED BY BSL?
3. WHAT POSITION DO THE LEADING ANIMAL-RELATED ORGANIZATIONS TAKE ON BSL?
4. AREN'T CERTAIN BREEDS OF DOGS MORE LIKELY TO INJURE OR BITE THAN OTHERS?
5. DOES BSL REDUCE DOG BITES?
6. HOW COSTLY IS IT TO IMPLEMENT AND ENFORCE BSL?
7. WHAT IS THE TREND IN BSL?
8. WHAT IS THE BEST WAY TO REDUCE DOG BITE-RELATED INCIDENTS IN A COMMUNITY? Q: What is breed-specific legislation? Breed-specific legislation (BSL), also referred to as breed-discriminatory legislation (BDL), is a law or ordinance that prohibits or restricts the keeping of dogs of specific breeds, and/or dogs presumed to be mixes of one or more of those breeds. The most drastic form of BSL is a complete ban; but BSL also includes any laws or governmental regulations that impose separate requirements or limitations, including but not limited to: mandatory spay-neuter, mandatory muzzling, special liability insurance requirements, special licensing, property posting requirements, confinement requirements, breed-specific pet limits, sale or transfer notification requirements, and prohibitions in government and military housing. BSL, in all of its forms, results in the destruction of many pet dogs. Q: What breeds of dogs have been targeted by BSL? Various breeds have been or currently are targeted by BSL. Until the law was repealed in 2009, Italy regulated the keeping of 17 breeds. In the United States, jurisdictions have either banned or put discriminatory restrictions on one or all of the following: American Bulldog, American Staffordshire Terrier, American Pit Bull Terrier, Bull Terrier, Cane Corso, Chihuahua, Chow Chow, Doberman Pinscher, Dogo Argentina, German Shepherd Dog, Miniature Bull Terrier, "Pit bull" (please note that "pit bull" is not a breed of dog), Presa Canario, Staffordshire Bull Terrier, Rottweiler, and wolf-hybrids. These ordinances also target dogs suspected of being mixes of one or more of the named breeds. Q. What position do the leading animal-related organizations take on BSL? All of the following national organizations oppose BSL: American Animal Hospital Association, American Dog Owner's Association, American Humane Association, American Kennel Club, American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, American Veterinary Medical Association, Association of Pet Dog Trainers, Best Friends Animal Society, Canadian Kennel Club, Humane Society of the United States, International Association of Canine Professionals, National Animal Control Association, National Animal Interest Alliance, and National Association of Obedience Instructors. In addition, many state and local-level veterinary medical associations and humane organizations oppose BSL. Q. Aren't certain breeds of dogs more likely to injure or bite than others? No. There is no scientific evidence that one kind of dog is more likely than any other to injure a human being.[1] In fact, there is evidence to the contrary.[2] A recent survey of the controlled study of dog bites covering 40 years and two continents concluded that no group of dogs should be considered disproportionately dangerous.[3] Q. Does BSL reduce dog bites?
No. BSL has not succeeded in reducing dog bite-related injuries wherever in the world it has been enacted. • An analysis published in the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association explains why BSL does not reduce serious dog bites. The authors calculated the absurdly large numbers of dogs of targeted breeds who would have to be completely removed from a community in order to prevent even one serious dog bite-related injury. For example, in order to prevent a single hospitalization resulting from a dog bite, the authors calculate that a city or town would have to remove more than 100,000 dogs of a targeted group. To prevent a second hospitalization, double that number.[4]
• Denver, CO enacted a breed ban in 1989. Citizens of Denver continue to suffer a higher rate of hospitalization from dog bite-related injuries after the ban, than the citizens of breed-neutral Colorado counties.[5]
• A study published in the Journal of Veterinary Behavior (2007), compared medically treated dog bites in Aragon, Spain for 5 years prior to and following enactment of Spain’s “Law on the legal treatment of the possession of dangerous animals” (sometimes referred to Spain’s Dangerous Animal Act) (2000). The results showed no significant effect in dog bite incidences when comparing before and after enactment of the BSL.[6] • The Netherlands repealed a 15-year-old breed ban in 2008 after commissioning a study of its effectiveness. The study revealed that BSL was not a successful dog-bite mitigation strategy because it had not resulted in a decrease in dog bites. [7]
• The Province of Ontario in Canada enacted a breed ban in 2005. In 2010, based on a survey of municipalities across the Province, the Toronto Humane Society reported that, despite five years of BSL and the destruction of "countless" dogs, there had been no significant decrease in the number of dog bites.[8]
• Winnipeg, Manitoba enacted a breed ban in 1990. Winnipeg’s rate of dog bite-injury hospitalizations is virtually unchanged from that day to this, and remains significantly higher than the rate in breed-neutral, responsible pet ownership Calgary.[9] Q. How costly is it to implement and enforce BSL? BSL is very costly, penalizes responsible pet owners, diverts resources, and is open to challenge. • Use the Best Friends Fiscal Impact Calculator: http://bestfriends.guerrillaec... to calculate an estimate of the additional expenses for your community (and you as a taxpayer) that will result from BSL: costs for enforcement, kenneling, euthanasia and litigation, among others. • Miami-Dade County banned “pit bulls” in 1989. The ban did not reduce dog bites, but has generated litigation costs. Hearing officer proceedings, as well as a circuit court case, have questioned the enforceability of the law. • The Department of Justice guidelines for the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) state that it is contrary to the Act to deny a disabled person equal access to public facilities based upon the presumed breed of their service dog. This has exposed municipalities with BSL to litigation costs when they have attempted to deny such access based the presumed breed of a person’s service dog.
Q: What is the trend in BSL?
There is a growing awareness that BSL does not improve community safety and penalizes responsible dog owners and their family companions. Both the Netherlands and Italy have repealed their BSL in recent years. From January 2012-May 2014, more than seven times as many American communities have either considered and rejected a breed- specific ordinance, or repealed an existing one, as have enacted BSL.[10] Massachusetts, Nevada, Connecticut, Rhode Island, South Dakota and Utah have recently enacted state laws that prohibit their towns and counties from regulating dogs on the basis of breed. Eighteen states now prohibit BSL. The Obama Administration has announced its opposition to BSL, stating that “research shows that bans on certain types of dogs are largely ineffective and often a waste of public resources.”[11]
Q. What is the best way to reduce dog bite-related incidents in a community? Dogs cannot be characterized apart from people. At the heart of any public safety issue involving dogs is the need for responsible pet ownership. Effective laws hold dog owners responsible for the humane care, custody, and control of all dogs regardless of breed or type. Humane communities are safer communities. Updated 17 March 2014. Click on the thumbnail to print this page. [1] Centers for Disease Control. (2008). Dog Bite: Fact Sheet. Retrieved from: http://www.cdc.gov/HomeandRecr....
[2] Ott, S.A., Schalke, E., von Gaertner, A.M., & Hackbarth, H. (2008). Is There a Difference? Comparison of Golden Retrievers and Dogs Affected by Breed-Specific Legislation Regarding Aggressive Behavior.Journal of Veterinary Behavior, (3)3: 134-140.
[3] American Veterinary Medical Association: Animal Welfare Division. (2012). Dog Bite Risk and Prevention: The Role of Breed. Retrieved from: https://www.avma.org/KB/Resour...
[4] Patronek, G.J., Slater, M., & Marder, A. (2010). Use of a number-needed-to-ban calculation to illustrate limitations of breed-specific legislation in decreasing the risk of dog bite-related injury.. Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association,237(7): 788-792.
[5] National Canine Research Council. (2013). Denver’s Breed-Specific Legislation: Brutal, Costly, and Ineffective. Retrieved from:http://nationalcanineresearchc...
[6] Rosado, B., García-Belenguer, S., León, M., & Palacio, J. (2007). Spanish dangerous animals act: Effect on the epidemiology of dog bites. Journal of Veterinary Behavior, 2(5): 166-174.
[7] Cornelissen, J.,M., & Hopster, H. (2010). Dog bites in the Netherlands: a study of victims, injuries, circumstances and aggressors to support evaluation of breed specific legislation. Veterinary Journal, 186(3): 292-298.
[8] Peat, D. (2010, April 28). Pit bull ban fails to reduce dog bites. The Toronto Sun. Retrieved from:http://www.torontosun.com/news...
[9] National Canine Research Council. (2012). Winnipeg, Manitoba Far Behind Calgary in Community Safety. Retrieved from:http://nationalcanineresearchc...
[10] National Canine Research Council. (2014). Breed-specific legislation on the decline. Retrieved from: http://nationalcanineresearchc...
[11] The White House. (2013). Breed-Specific Legislation Is a Bad Idea. Retrieved from:https://petitions.whitehouse.g...

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I , my husband and two golden retrievers, are some of those who have been attacked by pit bulls. A pit bull ran three blocks to get us while we walked our dogs on leashes. These dogs need to be outlawed. I will never get over the attack. It is not "if" then attack, it is "when."

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Darrin-stephens

33 People dead by dog attack in 2013.
Pit bull type dogs killed thirty of them. sixteen of the twenty-nine dead are children.
Stars indicate people killed by a ‘family’ pit bull – ones that had been raised and cherished as an indoor pet, ‘never showed aggression before’, and knew the victim. Child fatalities by pit bull type dog (16):
Christian Gormanous – 4 yrs old Montgomery County, TX
Isaiah Aguilar – 2 yrs old Sabinal, TX
Ryan Maxwell – 7 yrs old ** Galesburg, IL.
Dax Borchardt – 14 mos old ** Walworth, WI.
Monica Laminack – 21 mos old ** Ellabelle, GA.
Tyler Jett – 7 yrs old Callaway, FL.
Jordyn Arndt – 4 yrs old ** Prairie City, IA.
Beau Rutledge – 2 yrs old ** Fulton County, GA.
Ayden Evans- 5 yrs old ** Jessieville, AR.
Nephi Selu – 6 yrs old ** Union City, CA.
Arianna Jolee Merrbach – 5 yrs old Effingham, SC.
Daniel (surname as yet not revealed) – 2 yrs old (Gilbert, Arizona) **
Samuel Eli Zamudio – 2 yrs old** Colton, CA
Jordan Ryan– 5 yrs old Baker city, Oregon
Levi Watson-Bradford-4 years old** White County, Arkansas
Jah’niyah White - 2 years old ** Chicago, Ill Adult fatalities by pit bull type (13):
Betty Todd – 65 yrs old ** Hodges, SC
Elsie Grace – 91 yrs old ** Hemet, CA
Claudia Gallardo – 38 yrs old Stockton, CA.
Pamela Devitt – 63 yrs old Littlerock, CA.
Carlton Freeman – 80 yrs old Harleyville, SC.
Linda Oliver – 63 yrs old Dayton, TX.
James Harding – 62 yrs old -Baltimore, MD
chased into traffic by two attacking pit bulls
Juan Campos – 96 yrs old Katy, Texas.
Terry Douglass 56 years old. **Baltimore, MD
Katherine Atkins-25 years old ** Kernersville, NC
Nga Woodhead-65 years old Spanaway, WA.
Joan Kappen, 75 years old Hot Springs Ark
Michal Nelson, 41 years old Valencia County, New Mexico ** (1 non-pit type killing) [Rachel Honabarger - 35 yrs old - mauled to death by her own GSD mix] Coshocton, OH. (1 husky-mix killing, unknown if the other half of the dog was pit bull) [Jordan Lee Reed – 5 yrs old] Kotzebue, AK (1 Shiba Inu killing) Mia Gibson - age 3 months, of Gibson, OH - mauled to death by family Shiba Inu. Three of the pit bull type dogs were BULL mastiffs, ie 40% pit-fighting bulldog. If 27 of 33 dead were killed by pit bull attack, that’s 82% dead by pit attack, 9% dead by ‘molosser’, 3% by some kind of GSD mix, 3% by a husky + possibly pit mix, 3% by Shiba Inu. If you count the pit-mix mastiffs as pit bull types, that’s 91% killed by attacking pit bull types. Pit types are only about 6% of the entire dog population. The man who ran into traffic kept pit bulls himself. He knew perfectly well what the two stranger pit bulls that were chasing him would do if they caught him, so he preferred to risk a swift death by oncoming car. 534 maimed by pit type dogs 2013 (as of November.28).

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@ Darrin Stephens

A mastiff is not a pit bull. The pit bull is a terrier. It can be a small thirty pound dog up to a large 100 pound dog. The mastiff is the largest breed in the world. Some have gotten to nearly 300 pounds. Any dog over 100 pounds could easily kill a small child simply by rough play, not an attack. That is what probably happened in the case of toddlers and infants who died as a result of a "dog attack". Notice almost all the child attacks were of children under five. A dog might not recognize a child crawling as a person, but as another animal. This could cause protecting their territory behavior in the dog. Pit bulls are good dogs, just as semi auto hand guns, are good guns. Neither is good with children however. People are stupid! All the bans in the world won't change that. Forty children died last year from being left in hot cars. Hundreds are run over in their driveways, when a parent backs the car up over them. Back up cameras will be required in cars as a result. I had a 80 pound pit bull very sweet dog, but I would have never allowed him to be with small child without my hand on his collar the whole time. He liked to jump up on people, it wasn't aggressive, but it would easily knock over a small person, and injure a child. The fourth of July is in a few days. Children will be injured by the hundreds by fireworks, but we will have them again next year. Some people will also die in fires, caused by these fireworks. The dog on Our Gang was a pit bull, as was several other dogs on TV and movies. They are cute, fun and very loyal. They are also strong, protective, and sometimes deadly, but people love them. They are also one of the most popular dogs, and because they are mixed in with other breeds, even more so. Their numbers alone make the likely hood of being involved statistically more likely. Blame the owner, breeder, or parent who lets child around dog owned by someone else, but not the entire breed.

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@ Darrin Stephens

WELL DONE, DARREN !!!! MAGNIFICENT SPEARHEAD ASSAULT ON THE MURDEROUS BEASTS OF DOGDOM !!! BEASTS MEANING THE BREEDERS , OWNERS AND THE ROADKILL WHENEVER I CAN RUN ONE OVER WIFF MY ESCALADE !!! KILL ALL DOG....
KILL ALL DOG BREEDERS .
KILL ALL DOG OWNERS , ESPECIALLY !!!!

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Darrin-stephens

24 People dead by dog attack in 2014
Pit bull type dogs killed 21 of them.
13 of the dead are children. Stars indicate people killed by a ‘family’ pit bull – ones that had
been raised and cherished as an indoor pet, ‘never showed aggression
before’, and knew the victim. Child fatalities by pit bull type dog (12)
Kara E. Hartrich, 4 years old, Bloomington, Illinois. **
Je'vaeh Maye, 2 years old, Temple Texas. **
Braelynn Rayne Coulter, 3 years old, High Point, North Carolina. **
Kenneth Santillan, 13 years old, Patterson, N.J. by a Bullmastiff
Raymane Camari Robinson, 2 years old, Killeen, TX by a Bullmastiff **
Mia Derouen, 4 years old, Houma, Louisiana **
Christopher Malone, 3 years old, Thornton, MS **
John Harvard, 5 year old, Riverside, AL **
Kassi Haith, 4 years old, Felton, Del.
Demonta Collins, 13 years old, Augusta, Georgia
he dashed into traffic as he was running from a pit bull attacking him and was hit by a car and was killed.
Davon Jiggetts,17 years old, Riverdale, Georgia
he dashed into traffic as he was running from a pit bull attacking him and was hit by a car as was the pit bull, both were killed.
Holden William Garrison-10 weeks old, Springfield Township, MI **
Friends of family state that the dog is a Pit bull Mix a Catahoula Hound mixed with Pit Bull. Adult fatalities by pit bull type (8):
Christina Burleson, 43 years old, Houston, Texas. **
Klonda S. Richey, 57 years old, Dayton, Ohio. by two Bullmastiff's
Nancy Newberry, 77 years old, Phoenix, AZ. **
Dorothy Hamilton, 85 years old, Kaufman, TX **
Petra Aguirre, 83 years old, San Antonio TX **
Betty Clark, 75 years old, San Antonio TX **
Katie Morrison, 20-years old, Smiths Station, AL **
Rita Pepe, 93 years old, Branford, Conn by a rescued pit bull That’s 88% killed by attacking pit bull type dogs.
Pit Bull type dogs are only about 6% of the entire dog population. Summer Sears, 4 years old, Tallassee, AL by Husky/German Shepard Cross
Nyhiem Wilfong, 1 year old, Caldwell County, N.C. by Rottweiler. ** 89-year-old Annabell Martin, Corona, CA. by her grandson’s three Rottweilers.** Non-bite fatalities:
Carlos Eligio Trevina – 54 y.o. – Idaho Falls ID ** – [Jan 9] – Died of a heart attack immediately after breaking up a fight between his seven pit bulls / pit mixes

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Darrin-stephens

Merritt Clifton Editor Of Animals24-7: I have logged fatal & disfiguring dog attacks in the U.S. and Canada since September 1982. Overall, of the 4,812 dogs involved in fatal and disfiguring attacks on humans since September 1982, 3,279 (68%) were pit bulls; 551 were Rottweilers; 4,109 (85%) were of related molosser breeds, including pit bulls, Rottweilers, mastiffs, bull mastiffs, boxers, and their mixes. Of the 558 human fatalities, 294 were killed by pit bulls; 87 were killed by Rottweilers; 422 (75%) were killed by molosser breeds. Of the 2,904 people who were disfigured, 1,989 (68%) were disfigured by pit bulls; 322 were disfigured by Rottweilers; 2,466 (84%) were disfigured by molosser breeds. Of the 4,793 dogs involved in fatal and disfiguring attacks on humans occurring in the U.S. & Canada since September 1982, when I began logging the data, 3,260 (68%) were pit bulls; 551 were Rottweilers; 4,090 (85%) were of related molosser breeds, including pit bulls, Rottweilers, mastiffs, bull mastiffs, boxers, and their mixes. Of the 557 human fatalities, 293 were killed by pit bulls; 87 were killed by Rottweilers; 421 (75%) were killed by molosser breeds. Of the 2,893 people who were disfigured, 1,979 (68%) were disfigured by pit bulls; 322 were disfigured by Rottweilers; 2,456 (84%) were disfigured by molosser breeds. Pit bulls--exclusive of their use in dogfighting--also inflict more than 70 times as many fatal and disfiguring injuries on other pets and livestock as on humans, a pattern unique to the pit bull class. Fatal and disfiguring attacks by dogs from shelters and rescues have exploded from zero in the first 90 years of the 20th century to 80 in the past four years, including 58 by pit bulls, along with 22 fatal & disfiguring attacks by other shelter dogs, mostly Rottweilers & bull mastiffs. The only dogs rehomed from U.S. shelters to kill anyone, ever, before 2000 were two wolf hybrids in 1988 and 1989. 33 U.S. shelter dogs & one U.K. shelter dog have participated in killing people since 2010, including 24 pit bulls, seven bull mastiffs, and two Rottweilers. Surveys of dogs offered for sale or adoption indicate that pit bulls and pit mixes are less than 6% of the U.S. dog population; molosser breeds, all combined, are 9%.

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Darrin-stephens

About 31,400 dogs attacked about 61,500 other animals in the U.S. in 2013, killing 43,500 and seriously injuring 18,100. The animals killed included about 12,000 dogs, 8,000 cats, 6,000 hooved animals, and 17,000 other small domestic animals, primarily poultry. The seriously injured included about 12,400 dogs, 4,000 cats, and 1,700 hooved animals. Few small mammals and poultry survived reported dog attacks. Pit bulls inflicted 99% of the total fatal attacks on other animals (43,000); 96% of the fatal attacks on other dogs (11,520); 95% of the fatal attacks on livestock (5,700) and on small mammals and poultry (16,150); and 94% of the fatal attacks on cats (11,280). About 30,000 pit bulls were involved in attacks on other animals, many of them killing multiple other animals. There are about 3.2 million pit bulls in the U.S. at any given time, according to the annual Animal24-7 surveys of dogs offered for sale or adoption via online classified ads. Thus in 2013 about one pit bull in 107 killed or seriously injured another animal, compared with about one dog in 50,000 of other breeds. Nationally, fatal and disfiguring attacks by dogs from shelters and rescues have exploded from zero in the first 90 years of the 20th century to 80 since 2010, including 58 by pit bulls, along with 22 fatal & disfiguring attacks by other shelter dogs, mostly Rottweilers & bull mastiffs. Altogether, 33 U.S. shelter dogs have participated in killing people since 2010, including 24 pit bulls, seven bull mastiffs, and two Rottweilers. The only dogs rehomed from U.S. shelters to kill anyone before 2000 were two wolf hybrids, rehomed in 1988 and 1989, respectively.

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@ Darrin Stephens

Bull sit, pit bulls did not kill 96% of the dogs attacked by other dogs. It is statistically impossible with all the large aggressive breeds out there. German Shepherds, are not in the same family as pits. and they killed 50 people between 1982 and 2010, Rottweillers73, Husky 14, you really expect me to believe these dog breeds combined account for only 1% of deadly attacks on dogs. I got these numbers from Dog Bite Lawyer. Then you state that there was zero fatal attacks by shelter dogs in the beginning years of the twentieth century. Do you really believe, that there is accurate records involving where each dog came from, that was involved in a fatal attack. A stray dog, could have came from shelter, at a earlier time.

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Darrin-stephens

MARK WULKAN, MD, surgeon at Children's Healthcare of Atlanta "There is a difference with the pit bulls. In the last two years we've seen 56 dog injuries that were so severe the patient had to be admitted to the hospital so this doesn't count just a little bite and then goes to the emergency room. Of those 56, 21 were pit bulls. And then when we look at our data even further, of the kids that were most severely injured, those that were in the hospital for more than 8 days or had life threatening injuries, 100% of those were pit bulls. STEPHEN COHN, MD, professor of surgery at the University of Texas Health Science Center “I think this is a public health hazard, this particular dog. We just have to have them contained in a way that protects the general public. I don't want to see another kid come in dead.” JOHN BINI, MD, chief of surgery at Wilford Hall Medical Center “There are going to be outspoken opponents of breed legislation, who say: ‘My pit bulls lie with my baby and play with my rabbit.' And that's fine. I just think we're seeing something here, and I think it does warrant a discussion as to whether this is a risk that a community wants to take.” MORTALITY, MAULING, AND MAIMING BY VICIOUS DOGS, April 2011 Annals of Surgery “Fortunately, fatal dog attacks are rare, but there seems to be a distinct relationship between the severity and lethality of an attack and the breed responsible,” they wrote in an article published in the April issue of the medical journal Annals of Surgery. “These breeds should be regulated in the same way in which other dangerous species, such as leopards, are regulated.” DAVID E. BLOCKER, BS, MD, Dog Bite Rates and Biting Dog Breeds in Texas, 1995-1997 Bite Rates by Breed page 23 One out of every 40 Pit Bulls (2.5%) and about one out of 75 Chow Chows (1.4%) generated a reported human bite each year (Table 29; Figure 7). One out of 100 Rottweilers (1%) caused a reported bite, and less than one out of 250 German Shepherds (0.37%) bit a human each year, not statistically different from the average for all dogs combined (0.53%). Huskies, Dobermans, and Australian Shepherds had bite rates slightly lower than German Shepherds but higher than Labrador Retrievers. Less than one in every 500 Labrador retrievers (0.15%) was associated with a reported bite each year. All other breeds examined individually, including Poodles, Cocker Spaniels, and Dachshunds, had bite rates lower than Labrador Retrievers. Odds ratios for each of the five most commonly biting dog breeds versus all others presented similar findings (Table 30). The odds of a Pit Bull in Bexar County causing a bite were 5 times greater than the odds for all other breeds combined, at 4.9 to 1. Chow Chows and Rottweilers also had odds ratios significantly greater than the average, at 2.9 to 1 and 1.8 to 1, respectively. The odds ratios for German Shepherds and Labrador Retrievers were significantly lower than the average, at 0.67 to 1 and 0.26 to 1. PETER ANTEVY, pediatric E.R. physician, Joe DiMaggio Children's Hospital Dr Antvey sees at least five dog-bite victims a month in his emergency room. Unfortunately, he said, "the biggest offender is the pit bull." MELISSA ARCA, MD The reality is that any dog can bite, and statistically speaking, a child is most likely to be bitten by the family dog or a dog that they know. When you're talking about bite severity resulting in life-threatening and even fatal injuries, pit bulls and Rottweilers are the main culprits. Experience absolutely colors our perception, and in this case I can't help but be affected by what I've seen. I will never forget a young child I treated in the ER during my pediatric residency. She suffered severe facial lacerations and tears to her face after a pit bull attack in her local park.

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Darrin-stephens

HORSWELL BB, CHAHINE CJ, oral surgeons Dog bites of the facial region are increasing in children according to the Center for Disease Control. To evaluate the epidemiology of such injuries in our medical provider region, we undertook a retrospective review of those children treated for facial, head and neck dog bite wounds at a level 1 trauma center. Most dog bites occurred in or near the home by an animal known to the child/family. Most injuries were soft tissue related, however more severe bites and injuries were observed in attacks from the pit-bull and Rottweiler breeds. Younger (under five years) children sustained more of the injuries requiring medical treatment. Injury Severity Scales were determined as well as victim and payer mix demographics, type and characteristics of injury, and complications from the attack. DR RICHARD SATTIN, chief of unintentional-injuries section of the Centers of Disease Control We're trying to focus public attention on this greatly underestimated public hazard. In 1979, pit bulls accounted for 20 percent of fatal attacks by dogs. That figure had risen to 62 percent by 1988. Nobody knows the dog population of the United States or the exact breakdown by breed. We do not believe that pit bulls represent anywhere near 42% percent of dogs in the United States. Therefore, we believe that the pit bull excess in deaths is real and growing. ROBERT D. NEWMAN, M.D. As a pediatrician I was disturbed to read Vicki Hearne's assertion that there are no bad breeds, just bad dogs (Op-Ed, April 15). There is ample evidence to suggest that certain breeds of dogs are more dangerous to children than others. From 1979 to 1994, there were 177 known dog-bite-related fatalities in the United States. Of these fatalities, 66 percent were caused by five breeds: pit bull, Rottweiler, shepherd, husky and malamute. If you include crosses among these five breeds, that number rises to 82 percent. Other breeds, like Labrador retrievers and golden retrievers were not implicated in a single fatality during this same period. I laud the American Kennel Club's attempt to include information about dog breeds considered ''not good with children'' in the coming edition of ''The Complete Dog Book,'' and lament the fact that the book is being recalled at the request of some breeders. Seattle, April 16, 1998 Dr. EDGAR JOGANIK (after trying to reattach scalp and ear to a pit bull victim) Pit bull attacks are typically the most severe, and in about one-third of all attacks, the animals are family pets or belong to close friends. That should be the message, that these dogs should not be around children, adults are just as likely to be victims. Everyone should be extremely cautious. DR. MICHAEL FEALY When a Pit Bull is involved the bites are worse. When they bite, they bite and lock and they don't let go... they bite lock and they rip and they don't let go. DR. CHRISTOPHER DEMAS Bites from pit bulls inflict much more damage, multiple deep bites and ripping of flesh and are unlike any other domestic animal I've encountered. Their bites are devastating - close to what a wildcat or shark would do. DR. AMY WANDEL, plastic surgeon I see just as many dog bites from dogs that are not pit bulls as bites from pit bulls. The big difference is pit bulls are known to grab onto something and keep holding so their damage they create is worse than other breeds. DR. PATRICK BYRNE, Johns Hopkins Hospital I can't think of a single injury of this nature that was incurred by any other species other than a pit bull or a rottweiler. ANDREW FENTON, M.D. As a practicing emergency physician, I have witnessed countless dog bites. Invariably, the most vicious and brutal attacks I have seen have been from the pit bull breed. Many of the victims have been children. In a recent study from the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, pit bull attacks accounted for more ER visits than all other breeds combined. In young children, the most common part of the body injured was the face. Numerous studies have proven that the number-one cause of dog bite fatalities is the pit bull breed. I am certain that many attacks are due to owner negligence, but the fact remains that many were unpredictable and were perpetrated by formerly "loving and loyal" pets. Dr. Chagnon has every right to leave our town as she claims she will if pit bulls are banned, just like every one of her patients has the right not to attend her clinic where she brings her pit bulls. I applaud Mayor Pro Tem Joanne Sanders for bringing this issue to the forefront. In the interest of public safety, I recommend we enforce a spay/neuter requirement on pit bulls while reviewing and revamping all of our policies relating to animal bites.

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Darrin-stephens

DON BAUERMEISTER, Council Bluffs, IA prosecutor All dogs can "get into it". The reality, though, for way too many dog owners is the sudden, unprovoked, violent and very serious attack from a pit bull. These folks have to pay the immediate vet bill. Yes, sometimes, the Court is able to intervene and order restitution, but what about the dead dog. What about the psychological damage to those who had to witness the attack. I have seen pit bulls attack and injure other dogs. It is something that you will never forget. A very purposeful bite, indeed. Pit bulls are pros and the rest of the dog world are amateurs. Man made them this way. KORY NELSON, Denver, CO City Attorney The most significant point about the justification for bans or restrictions of pit bulls is that these are not dependent upon a claim that every pit bull has a higher than average propensity for attacking humans. The justification is based on the clear evidence that, as a group, pit bulls, compared to other breeds, generally have a higher propensity to exhibit unique behavioral traits during an attack. These behaviors havea higher likelihood of causing more severe injuries or death. The Colorado Dog Fanciers trial court made this clear, stating that, while it could not be proven that pit bulls bite more than other dogs, there was “credible evidence that Pit Bull dog attacks are more severe and more likely to result in fatalities.” The court, in great detail, noted fourteen separate areas of differences, including: strength, manageability and temperament, unpredictability of aggression, tenacity, pain tolerance and manner of attack. A municipality that is experiencing a problem with pit bull attacks needs to consider for itself the best course of action to protect its citizens, especially those most likely to be unable to defend themselves from the tenacious and sustained attack of a pit bull, who will likely bite, hold, and tear at its victim despite efforts to stop it. However, given the clear rational evidence, breed-specific legislation is still a legally viable option.There is no new evidence that undermines the holdings of Colorado Dog Fanciers, only new relevant evidence that adds additional support for BSL, as the differential treatment of pit bulls is based upon logical, rational evidence from the scientific field of ethology. BOB JOHNSTONE, Cincinnati, OH city attorney We have amassed what I consider an overwhelming amount of information that demonstrates to me that pit bulls are, by far, responsible for more fatal or serious attacks than any other breed. JUDGE VICTOR E. BIANCHINI, San Diego, CA A pit bull is the closest thing to a wild animal there is in a domesticated dog. U.S. SUPREME COURT, April 26, 1897, SENTELL v. NEW ORLEANS & C. R. CO. Laws for the protection of domestic animals are regarded as having but a limited application to dogs and cats; and, regardless of statute, a ferocious dog is looked upon as hostis humani generis, and as having no right to his life which man is bound to respect.

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