by Free Britney at

JK Rowling believes that she made a mistake by not having Hermione Granger and Harry Potter end up together forever in her best-selling books.

The author disclosed that she brought Hermione and Ron Weasley together for “very personal reasons,” not because they were a “credible” couple.

Harry Potter and Hermione

She said this weekend in an interview: "I wrote the Hermione/Ron relationship as a form of wish fulfillment. That's how it was conceived, really."

“For reasons that have very little to do with literature and far more to do with me clinging to the plot as I first imagined it, Hermione ended up with Ron."

Rowling revealed in an epilogue to Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, the series' seventh and final installment, that Ron and Hermione were endgame.

They were to marry and have two children, while Harry would wed Ron’s younger sister, Ginny. That's all she wrote ... until she changed her mind?

The novelist has now said that she believes Ron and Hermione would have ended up needing relationship counseling, The Sunday Times reported.

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by Amanda Denton at

Put on your party hats because today marks a couple big birthdays.

Not only is J.K. Rowling turning 48, but her most famous character is also celebrating a birthday. Yes, folks, Harry Potter is 33!

J.K. Rowling and Harry Potter Photo

In honor of these milestones, let's attempt to do the impossible: rundown the top 10 moments in Harry Potter movie history! Scroll down for the list and try to keep your venom to a minimum in case we left out your favorite...

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by Free Britney at

Robert Galbraith, whose debut detective novel The Cuckoo's Calling recently debuted to critical acclaim, is actually none other than JK Rowling.

  • The Cuckoo's Calling
  • J.K. Rowling Picture

The Sunday Times revealed last weekend that Galbraith was just a pseudonym for the Harry Potter author, one of the best-known writers today.

Times arts editor Richard Brooks said his colleague, India Knight, was reading the book and tweeted about how good it was, especially for a debut.

"A very interesting reply came back, which said, it's not a debut novel, it's by an existing author," he told NPR. "So India tweeted back and said, 'Who?'"

"And a very straightforward, simple reply came back: 'J.K. Rowling,'" Brooks says. Then the Tweet, and Tweeter, were gone "like a Harry Potter spell."

"Gone. No trace!"

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