by Free Britney at

It's been almost two months since Michael Jackson passed away June 25, and what once looked like an open-and-shut case has sparked a massive investigation.

What is taking so long? Many things, some deeply intertwined and confusing.

If the singer's autopsy report reveals other drugs besides the anesthesia Propofol, prosecutors will have a harder time building a case against Dr. Conrad Murray.

As Jackson's personal physician, Murray is believed to have given Propofol to Michael on what was his final morning. But it could be a difficult case to argue he killed Jackson if the star were addicted to other prescription drugs.

Reports say police found Propofol an Xanax in Jackson's autopsy.

"You have to show that the doctor knew about all of these other doctors prescribing other drugs," says one Los Angeles deputy D.A. "It's a classic problem."

Picture of Michael Jackson

Dr. Conrad Murray, who reportedly admitted to police that he gave Jackson the hospital anesthetic in the hours before his death, has not been charged with any crime, and through his attorney he has maintained his innocence.

But search warrants served on Murray for his offices and storage facilities in Nevada and Texas indicate he's the target of a manslaughter investigation.

Many anesthesiologists say it is negligent and unusual for a doctor to administer Propofol in a home setting and not in a hospital, and without proper monitoring.

Legal experts think that fact alone not be enough to prosecute Murray.

Continue Reading...

Tags: ,

by Free Britney at

As police ramp up their investigation of Michael Jackson's death, a felony charge of manslaughter or even worse seems like an inevitability for Dr. Conrad Murray.

The best (or only) defense for Jackson's personal physician, a number of legal experts believe, may be a total smear campaign against the deceased music star.

Police are currently tracking Propofol shipments sent to Murray at the time he treated Jackson, believing the anesthetic to be the drug that killed the singer.

Mark Geragos, who successfully represented Michael Jackson during his 2004 child molestation trial, and most recently defended Chris Brown, spoke to E! Thursday, explaining why he rejected an overture to defend Dr. Conrad Murray.

Geragos thinks the doctor may wind up charged with murder, and that the embattled Murray will be forced to employ a scathing criticism of Jackson as a strategy.

Murray-Jackson

"Ultimately, that may be what the defense is, to say things about Michael that I'm just not going to say," Geragos said. "Whatever is required by somebody who is going to defend the doctor, is not something I can do ethically."

Or personally. "I've been approached," he said of the possibility that he would defend Dr. Conrad Murray. "But clearly I have a conflict of interest."

"I have represented Michael Jackson and I would not ever want to be in a position where I was deprecating Michael in any way, shape or form."

Rehashing Jackson's drug addictions and alleged doctor shopping - reports claim the singer sought prescriptions under 19 aliases - is one angle.

Three prescription drugs, including Xanax, were found in Jackson's system at his time of death, and Geragos suspects efforts at tracking down the drugs' source s the reason for the indefinitely delayed Michael Jackson toxicology results.

Continue Reading...

Tags: ,

by Free Britney at

Michael Jackson's personal physician, Dr. Conrad Murray, had a stash of the powerful anesthetic Propofol hidden closet in the late pop star's house.

That has been known, or at least presumed. But there are now signs that Murray either stored Propofol elsewhere or received regular deliveries.

Law enforcement sources say that they found three large bottles of Propofol and five smaller vials of the anesthetic in Michael Jackson's house.

The drugs were found in the closet attached to Dr. Conrad Murray's bedroom - where he administered Propofol and Jackson died in his bed June 25.

Police think Murray left him unattended after giving him the fatal dose.

In any event, anesthesiologists say if the stash was used to keep Michael asleep for eight hours, it would require about three bottles and five vials. In other words, the entire "stash" would have lasted one night. So he likely had a supplier.

Michael Joseph Jackson Picture

Conrad Murray regularly administered Propofol to keep Jackson asleep.

It is believed Murray was getting shipments of the drug through FedEx and may have been storing it outside Jackson's home, so he could regularly administer it.

A search warrant used to raid the Las Vegas pharmacy that Dr. Conrad Murray has used in the past has been obtained and there appears to be a direct link between the doctor and Propofol - and possibly a link to Michael Jackson as well.

Documents show authorities were looking for credit card receipts and other documents related to drugs purchased by Dr. Murray on May 12, 2009. The warrant mentions specific vials of Propofol manufactured by Teva and Hospira, Inc.

The LAPD found Propofol manufactured by Teva at Jackson's house.

Authorities were looking for FedEx records relating to "purchase, transfer, receiving, ordering, delivery and storage of Propofol to Dr. Conrad Murray."

The bottom line is that the authorities believe they know where and when the drugs that killed Jackson were purchased, but are leaving no stone unturned.

Tags: ,

by Free Britney at

Dr. Conrad Murray has been under wide scrutiny ever since Michael Jackson died June 25. The police and DEA investigation into the star's personal physician has centered around his use of Propofol, a hospital-grade anesthesia.

While that drug is believed to have killed the King of Pop on that day, sources close to the manslaughter investigation of Murray tell the Los Angeles Times that he may be charged with negligence. As in Murray essentially dosed-and-dashed.

One theory the police are working on? That Murray left the star completely alone after administering the fatal, final injection of Propofol. This is why they think there is just a gap between Jackson's time of death and the first 911 call.

Dr. Conrad Murray reportedly left Jackson in his bed in order to make phone calls and, when he returned, discovered the star was no longer breathing.

It's unclear how long the doctor was out of the room, though Murray told detectives he frequently left Michael alone and it had never been a problem.

Well, except for that last time.

Smiling Michael Jackson

Dr. Conrad Murray was the last person to see Michael Jackson alive.

Investigators are now trying to determine whether to slap negligence onto their existing manslaughter investigation, not only for leaving Michael Jackson alone that morning but for administering Propofol outside of a hospital in general.

Other drugs were found in Jackson's system at the time of his death, making it more difficult, potentially, to find Murray definitively guilty of manslaughter.

A law enforcement source also says that Jackson used Propofol for insomnia for nearly a decade, while Murray only came on as the singer's doctor this year.

Murray apparently told police he administered the drug in the early hours of June 25, after Jackson returned home from a rehearsal and could not sleep.

Murray's lawyer, Ed Chernoff, verified at least part of the sources' claims, confirming to the Times that his client did in fact chat with family members and employees in his medical offices prior to discovering Jackson's lifeless body.

As it is, while he's been netting all the headlines, Conrad Murray is one of five doctors the LAPD is investigating in connection to Jackson's death.

He is, however, the only one who has been publicly identified as a suspect.

Tags: ,

by Free Britney at

Michael Jackson spent his final hours in Dr. Conrad Murray's bedroom. In his personal physician's bed, as a matter of fact, investigators are saying.

Law enforcement sources say Jackson did not want people going in and out of his room, so he used Murray's bedroom when he received his IV of Propofol.

Michael Jackson Jr. Birth Certificate

Dr. Conrad Murray administered the powerful anesthesia to Jackson - as he was doing almost nightly - hours before he died, as the singer lay in his bed.

Emergency workers found an IV stand, an empty IV bag and oxygen tanks in Murray's room. Cops found a secret stash of Propofol and other drugs hidden in a closet connected to Murray's room in their searches after Michael passed away.

At some point, Dr. Conrad Murray left the room when Jackson was receiving an IV drip of Propofol and the doctor may have even fallen asleep. Cops believe by the time he woke, Michael Jackson's heart may have already stopped beating.

Dr. Murray was not in Jackson's house during the day. He would show up in the evening and leave in the morning. Law enforcement believes the doc may have regularly gone there at night to administer Propofol via IV so he could sleep.

Law enforcement officials believe that Dr. Conrad Murray may have discovered Michael Jackson around 9 a.m. on June 25 the day of the singer's death.

One theory cops are working on in their massive manslaughter investigation is that after discovering Jackson either in distress or dead, Dr. Murray called two employees in Houston and told them to remove boxes from his storage unit.

Both women - LaQuisha Middleton and her sister, LaQuanda Price - say Dr. Murray did not call them, but police think that's dubious. The stories of these women conflict. One says a box of needles was retrieved; the other, a chair.

As for what may have been in the boxes, law enforcement is investigating whether Dr. Murray had Propofol delivered to his Houston medical office ... possibly put in his storage unit ... and then FedEx'd to Los Angeles as needed.

Dr. Conrad Murray rented the storage unit April 1 and staff went back on four different occasions before Jackson's death. Law enforcement remains on the hunt for evidence of Propofol when they searched Dr. Conrad Murray's home and offices.

According to the search warrants, authorities were looking for, among other things, "records, shipping orders, distribution lists, use records relating to the purchase, transfer, receiving, ordering, delivery and storage of PROPOFOL."

The warrant also stated officials were looking to prove a number of alleged violations, including "prescribing to an addict" and "excessive prescribing."

Tags: ,

by Free Britney at

Michael Jackson's chef, Kai Chase, is speaking out about the day the King of Pop died and the role played by the singer's personal physician, Dr. Conrad Murray.

Chase said she knew something was amiss when Murray didn't come downstairs to get the juices and granola he routinely brought Michael Jackson each morning.

Kai also said she was also used to seeing the doctor coming down the steps carrying oxygen tanks. But Murray didn't come downstairs on the morning of June 25.

"I thought maybe Mr. Jackson is sleeping late," Chase said.

"I started preparing the lunch and then I looked at my cell phone and it was noon. About 12:05 or 12:10 Dr. Murray runs down and screams, 'Go get Prince!'"

"He's screaming loud. I run to the den where the kids are playing. Prince runs to meet Dr. Murray and from then on, the energy in the house just changed."

"I walked into the hall and I saw the children there. The daughter (Paris Jackson) was crying," Kai Chase continued. "I saw paramedics running up the stairs."

Celebrity chef Kai Chase has also worked with numerous other stars.

Then, a small group consisting of the three children, their nanny (Grace Rwaramba) and Chase held hands and began to pray in a circle, the chef recalled.

As paramedics raced to the room - with Jackson already dead - Chase said, "We were all praying, 'Help Mr. Jackson be O.K.' "Then everyone was very quiet."

At about 1:30 p.m. she said that security guards told her and other staff to leave the property because "Mr. Jackson was being taken to the hospital."

Jackson was pronounced dead at 2:26 p.m.

Authorities raided the home and office of Murray's in Las Vegas Tuesday, following a raid last week at his clinic and storage facility in Houston last week.

Investigators believe Jackson died from a fatal dose of Propofol, an anesthetic allegedly supplied by Dr. Conrad Murray sometime the morning of June 25.

Tags: , , ,

by Free Britney at

DEA agents, the LAPD and Las Vegas police are executing search warrants on the Las Vegas home and office of Michael Jackson’s personal doctor, Conrad Murray.

Officials raided Dr. Murray’s gated community and his office, Global Cardiovascular Associates today. His Houston office was similarly searched last week.

This marks the latest development in a month-long manslaughter investigation that places Murray at the center of the mystery surrounding Jackson’s death.

Law enforcement officials believe Murray gave Jackson Propofol, a powerful anesthesia, hours before his death. Reports say he admitted as much in interviews.

Dr. Murray's lawyer, Edward Chernoff, has said only that the doctor "didn't prescribe or administer anything that should have killed Michael Jackson."

The investigative team heading the probe into Jackson’s death are conducting interviews with physicians and personnel at medical facilities in Las Vegas.

Like last week, the warrants issued today permit the authorities to search for "property or items constituting evidence of the offense of manslaughter that tend to show that Dr. Conrad Murray committed the said criminal offense."

Toxicology reports are still pending, but investigators are working under the assumption that Propofol caused Jackson's heart to stop, officials believe.

A search warrant was granted based on preliminary toxicology reports that indicate that Propofol contributed to the death of the King of Pop on June 25.

Michael Jackson is believed to have been using the drug for about two years and investigators are trying to determine how many other doctors administered it.

An AP source says Jackson relied on Propofol "like an alarm clock." A doctor would administer it when MJ went to sleep, then stop it when he wanted to get up.

Authorities also raided a storage unit belonging to Murray in Houston, where two unnamed women were seen removing files shortly after Jackson passed away.

Police say Dr. Conrad Murray is cooperating and is not a suspect.

Murray became Michael Jackson's personal physician in May and was to set to accompany the superstar to London for a series of concerts starting this July.

He was staying with Jackson in the L.A. mansion and, according to Chernoff, "happened to find" an unconscious Jackson in the pop star's bedroom June 25.

Though police say he was dead when paramedics arrived, Murray tried to revive him by compressing his chest with one hand while supporting his back.

Police found Propofol and other drugs in Jackson's home. An IV line and three oxygen tanks were in the room. Murray also kept a secret drug stash.

Using Propofol to sleep exceeds the drug's purpose, as it can depress breathing and lower heart rates and blood pressure. Because of the risks, Propofol is supposed to be administered only in medical settings by trained personnel.

Cops on the Scene
Tags: ,

by Free Britney at

Police have long believed Dr. Conrad Murray administered Propofol, a potent anesthesia that should never be found outside a hospital, to Michael Jackson.

They have also been operating under the assumption that this killed him.

Well, there's a good reason police believe Murray gave the star the drug. It turns out he admitted doing so two days after Jackson's death back on June 25.

Dr. Conrad Murray told the LAPD he administered Propofol to the music icon hours before he died. This is according to multiple law enforcement sources.

Murray gave Jackson an IV drip of the powerful anesthesia.

Police believe Murray simply wasn't paying attention when the star's heart stopped beating, thus accounting for the timeline gap in between when the coroner's office believes Jackson flatlined and when the 911 call was placed.

One theory? Dr. Conrad Murray fell asleep while the drug was being administered and awakened to find Michael Jackson dead of cardiac arrest. The singer died by the time paramedics arrived, though Murray did not let them call it there.

An IV drip of Propofol allows for a constant, steady infusion of the drug during a period of time determined by the trained professional administering it.

Again, this is supposed to take place in a hospital.

Moreover, it is considered reckless in the medical community for a doctor to administer an IV drip of Propofol without the patient being monitored by an EKG, which monitors the patient's pulse. No EKG was found in Michael's house.

Another device called a pulse oximeter is used to determine the oxygen saturation in the patient's blood. If the patient's breathing slows to dangerous levels, an alarm will alert the treating physician. No oximeter was found in the house.

No one knows precisely why the drug was administered.

If the above is all true, however, we suspect it is only a matter of time before Dr. Conrad Murray faces the music, possibly even manslaughter charges.

Tags: ,

by Free Britney at

The strange circumstances surrounding the death of Michael Jackson have law enforcement personnel working overtime to figure out exactly what happened.

It seems that the longer the investigation into just how the superstar passed away continues, the more disturbing and perplexing some of the details become.

Michael Jackson Trial Pic

One of the theories investigators are exploring, according to TMZ, is that the singer's personal physician, Dr. Conrad Murray administered Propofol to him.

After giving Jackson the hospital-grade anesthesia, the mere possession of which is probably enough for him to face criminal charges, Murray left the room.

When he returned, he discovered Michael Jackson's dead body.

We emphasize that this is only a theory. However, it would explain the timeline gap between when Murray says he found MJ and when a 911 call was made.

The iconic Michael Jackson (1958-2009).

Sources say when paramedics arrived Michael Jackson was already dead - even though Murray would not let them pronounce him as such on the scene - and found with an IV in his arm, an IV stand nearby along with an empty IV bag and oxygen tank.

The paramedics on the scene say Dr. Conrad Murray's conduct was "strange" - he was "hard to deal with" and was "getting in the way" of emergency responders.

The paramedics wanted to pronounce Michael Jackson dead at the house but Dr. Murray, who has higher authority, insisted they transport the singer to a hospital.

At the UCLA Medical Center, doctors gave up on resuscitation efforts because Jackson was clearly dead, but Dr. Murray - now the target of a manslaughter investigation - continued CPR, which some of the doctors found odd, to say the least.

As always, more details as the story develops ...

Tags: ,

by Free Britney at

When paramedics arrived at Michael Jackson's house, he was already dead and it took them a while to even realize the victim was the music icon, new reports say.

Jackson was flatlined when the paramedics arrived shortly after noon PST on June 25. There was no electrical activity in Michael's heart and no sign of life.

Michael Jackson Autopsy Findings

Paramedics wanted to pronounce him dead at the scene but Dr. Conrad Murray, Jackson's personal physician, insisted the singer be transported to the hospital.

As a higher medical authority than the EMTs, Dr. Conrad Murray had the power to overrule them. So it went and EMT personnel could not "call it" at his home.

Paramedics didn't realize for nearly 10 minutes the victim was Michael Jackson. As one emergency worker put it: "It just looked like a frail, old, sickly man."

Meanwhile, law enforcement sources continuing to investigate Conrad Murray say he kept a stash of drugs - including the powerful anesthesia Propofol, which they think stopped Michael Jackson's heart - hidden in his closet.

Sources say when the LAPD first searched Jackson's home the night he died, they did not turn up Propofol or many of the other drugs that were in his house.

Dr. Murray talked to the LAPD the following Saturday and the incriminating statements he supplied triggered another, broader search warrant, police are saying.

Cops returned to the house the next Monday and found "various drugs" clandestinely stashed in a closet of the guest room where Dr. Conrad Murray stayed.

Dr. Murray himself apparently told detectives about the closet when interviewed, triggering the search and ultimately a manslaughter investigation against him.

A law enforcement source tells TMZ that "The drugs were concealed... they weren't obvious." Among the stash - Propofol, the drug they believe killed Jackson.

Tags: ,