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A month after Kony 2012, the documentary about the crimes of indicted Ugandan warlord Joseph Kony, took the Internet by storm, a sequel has arrived.

A sequel that's more of a follow-up to capitalize on the success of the original, which drew more than 100 million views on YouTube, but a sequel just the same.

The non-profit Invisible Children released a new film, Kony 2012: Part II - Beyond Famous, today. You can watch the 20-minute expose in its entirety here:

Kony 2012 drew attention to the reign of terror by Joseph Kony's Lord's Resistance Army and examined strategies activists take to stop the guerilla leader.

Accused of kidnapping children and turning them into soldiers, among other war crimes, the Ugandan national has become persona non grata ... everywhere.

Missing from the sequel is Jason Russell, the Invisible Children co-founder who directed the first installment and ended up arrested and hospitalized after an unbelievable meltdown earlier this month near his home in San Diego.

As he recovers, Invisible Children seeks to silence critics that the group practices "slacktivism," i.e. oversimplifying issues and having the adverse effect of elevating Kony's celebrity instead of tackling the complexities of the subject.

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Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney inched closer to his party's nomination on Tuesday with a sweep of the GOP primaries in Wisconsin, Maryland and the District of Columbia, and found himself in his first direct engagement with President Obama.

Romney emerged from the evening with substantial gains in delegates and a growing perception that he was winning over previously reluctant elements of the party, or if nothing else, just plain outlasting his more conservative competition.

Either way, this was in some respects the start of the general election.

Romney Ohio Pic

Obama for the first time singled Romney out by name, during an address dedicated to a budget championed by Romney’s marquee endorser in Wisconsin, Rep. Paul Ryan.

The President called Ryan's plan “social Darwinism” and said of Romney, “He said that he’s ‘very supportive’ of this new budget, and he even called it ‘marvelous,’ which is a word you don’t often hear when it comes to describing a budget."

"It’s a word you don’t hear generally.”

Referring obliquely to perceptions of his potential opponent’s elite pedigree, Obama sought to cast himself as more in touch with the public.

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Sarah Palin appeared on Today this morning, first as a guest and then as a co-host, in what was a mostly enjoyable stint on the NBC morning show institution.

Matt Lauer did ask her some tough questions, though nothing about how Levi Johnston got Sunny Oglesby pregnant. Hey, no journalist is perfect.

The mood was jovial as Palin opened with a story about a stranger who, when she was headed to NBC's 30 Rockefeller Plaza, said she knew Palin was Tina Fey.

Lauer’s interview with Palin about the Republican presidential race - voters in Wisconsin, Maryland, and D.C. vote today - quickly turned more serious.

Her message: “Anybody but Obama will be so much better for our country,” and the experience level of  the winner's V.P. choice doesn't matter. Why?

Because no matter who it is, the 2008 nominee opines, “they’re gonna get clobbered by the lamestream media who does not like the conservative message.”

As Lauer then pointed out, though, Sarah Palin herself was about to become a card carrying member of the lamestream media for the next hour. Ziiiiing!

As co-host, Palin talked with Tori Spelling and experts on raising teenage daughters, weighed in on Oprah's mistakes with OWN and talked about the new "EnemyGraph" Facebook app, which allows you to create a list of enemies, not friends.

Speaking of which, sort of ... please "Like" THG on Facebook!

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Former political figure Sarah Palin has signed up to co-host the Today show this week for some reason, NBC reports. She will do the honors tomorrow (Tuesday).

According to a message posted on the network’s official site, Palin, 48, is getting ready to “reveal a different side of her than you’ve seen before.”

What side could that be? Intelligence?

Sarah Palin in Alaska

The 2008 GOP V.P. nominee and Alaska Governor will, interestingly enough, be going up against Katie Couric, who's hosting Good Morning America all week.

Katie's now-infamous CBS News interview with Sarah during the '08 campaign was widely viewed as one of the turning points for the Republican's public image.

Or another case of the "gotcha" lame-stream media doing all it can to cut her down just 'cause she's conservative, if you believe Sarah's version of events.

Anyway, we'll be watching tomorrow! You?

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Did Rick Santorum almost call President Obama the n-word?

Multiple news outlets are featuring a video of the Republican President candidate speaking to a crowd in Wisconsin this week (below), where he said:

“We know the candidate Barack Obama, what he was like – the anti-war government ...” He then starts to say a word starting with “n-” or "ni-".

He continues, “America was a source for division around the world, that what we were doing was wrong.” Did he almost drop the n-word? Listen:

Santorum’s team, of course, insists this is BS: “Give me a break. That’s unbelievable. What does it say about those that are running with this story that that’s where their mind goes. You know, I’m not going to dignify that with [a response].”

The n-word, one hopes, is never in anyone's thoughts, even subconsciously. The debates showed time and again that Rick Santorum, when frustrated, rapidly loses eloquence and becomes tongue-tied, stuttering slightly. Could that be all this is?

On the flip side ... what other ni-word was that supposed to be?

You tell us: Was Santorum about to drop the n-bomb?

 

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Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney was endorsed by former President George H.W. Bush this week, meeting with the former Commander-in-Chief.

The nation's 41st president said that Romney is a good man who would make a "great president." And he says it's time for Republicans to unite behind Romney.

The pair, joined by former first lady Barbara Bush, briefly faced reporters Thursday night in Bush Sr.'s Houston office to make the endorsement official.

The 87-year-old Bush had informally endorsed the GOP frontrunner on multiple occasions in recent months, but hadn't appeared on his behalf until now.

Bush and Mitt

One of Bush's sons, former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, endorsed Romney last week. Another son, former President George W. Bush, has stayed out of the GOP race.

It's unclear the degree to which his input would be welcomed.

"I haven't met with President George W. Bush. We speak from time to time," Romney replied when asked if he had sought the younger Bush's endorsement.

George W. Bush, who lives in Dallas and has kept a very low profile since leaving office, did not attend any of Romney's six Texas fundraisers this month.

The Bush legacy of gaping budget deficits, two wars and low approval ratings has merited no more than a fleeting reference from Romney and his rivals.

W.'s virtual absence from the presidential contest seemed to surprise even his father as reporters visited H.W.'s office to watch him endorse Romney.

"Has he endorsed you?" George H.W. Bush quietly asked Romney as reporters started to leave the room. "Uh, no, no," Romney replied.

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Barack Obama is sexy, and he knows it.

So much so that The President of the United States loves to sing "Sexy and I Know It" by LMFAO, it turns out. Okay, "sings" is a bit of a stretch. But he does speak the lyrics in a montage of spliced-together clips set to the beat of the hit song.

The result? A hilarious foreign policy platform, to say the least.

Girl. Look at that. Body. I-I-I-I work out. Enjoy:

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Opening arguments began today as the U.S. Supreme Court prepares to rule on President Obama's landmark national health care law later this year.

Whatever the nine justices decide, it will be historic.

The so-called individual mandate is the linchpin of the law and came under scrutiny as the nation's highest court launched into its hearing Tuesday. 

That provision of the law requires Americans to buy health insurance, and it could unravel President Obama's biggest domestic policy achievement. 

President Barack Obama Image

The justices must decide how much power the federal government has in forcing every American to purchase a product or enroll in a government program.

Lawmakers have never before used this power, as insurance, while obviously valuable in countless situations, is a product one could theoretically avoid.

Proponents of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, a.k.a. ObamaCare, say it's unprecedented because it's never been this necessary.

Opponents contend it's because the authority doesn't exist, and argue it must be struck down by the high court on grounds of unconstitutionality.

The Supreme Court justices will be looking at three significant constitutional areas to determine whether the Affordable Care Act (ACA) is lawful:

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The leak of George Zimmerman's statement to police have shed new light on the Trayvon Martin case, along with accusations of bias against the media and public.

Until Tuesday, the case had been framed from Martin's standpoint, which is certainly understandable to a point, as he was unarmed when he was shot and killed.

However, Zimmerman’s defense depicts Trayvon not as an unsuspecting youngster chased by an armed vigilante, but as a violent aggressor who left him no choice.

Some commentators point to Zimmerman’s story as evidence that the media and public have been too quick to lay blame in a case that has gripped the nation.

  • George Zimmerman Mug Shot
  • Trayvon Martin Photo

Zimmerman’s claim that he was jumped and beaten to the point where he shot Martin in self-defense seems dubious, especially if a dispatcher told him not to pursue the boy.

Nevertheless, he hasn't been charged with a crime.

You wouldn't know it by the mug shot, taken after a previous arrest, circulated by the media for the last month - most times, next to a five-year-old photo of Martin.

The contrast of the above images has indirectly but significantly shaped the way the sensationalized case is framed, turning the 17-year-old into an innocent martyr.

Martin's tragic death has sparked important public debate over racial profiling, gun laws and other broad social issues. Yet the media tends to sell a single narrative.

Consider how the following photos might portray the case instead:

  • George Zimmerman Picture
  • Trayvon Martin, Hoodie

Do a smiling Zimmerman in a suit and tie, or a current photo of Martin looking more like an adult, change your perception of either party? Probably at least a little.

NOTE: The authenticity of the Martin photo above, as well as others on the web (in which he sports fake good teeth), is disputed, but the point remains the same.

Stories such as President Obama's remarks or the "Million Hoodie March" get enormous attention and make the public fall in love with the idealized version of Martin.

The fact of the matter is, though, they have little to do with the case.

Police in Sanford, Fla., deserve to be under scrutiny for their decision not to arrest Zimmerman, but the April 10 grand jury investigation also needs to play itself out.

The truth, as is so often the case, won't be found easily. It almost unavoidably lies among a thousand shades of grey in a case of great complexity and magnitude.

By oversimplifying it and/or turning into an entertainment form, the media and public fail to honor both the deceased's memory and the accused's right to due process.

You tell us: Is there media bias in the Trayvon Martin case?

 

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President Obama has weighed in on the Trayvon Martin case, calling it a tragedy, urging cooperation among law enforcement and "soul searching" among all of us.

"If I had a son, he'd look like Trayvon," the Commander-in-Chief said, underscoring how the issue affected him on a personal, and not just a political or legal, level.

Of what Martin's parents are suffering through, Obama said:

"I think they are right to expect that all of us are going to take this with the seriousness it deserves, and we are going to get to the bottom of what happened."

"Obviously, this is a tragedy. I can only imagine what these parents are going through, and when I think about this boy, I think about my own kids."

"I think that every parent in America should be able to understand why it is absolutely imperative that we investigate every aspect of this, and that everybody pulls together - federal, state and local - to figure out exactly how this tragedy happened."

The statement by Obama came after he introduced Dartmouth President Jim Kim to be the next head of the World Bank during an appearance in the Rose Garden.

He took only one question before heading back to the West Wing, signaling that he was feeling pressure to make a public comment on the Trayvon Martin case.

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