Texas Secession Petition Garners 81,000 Signatures, Qualifies For White House Response

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Everything's bigger in Texas. That apparently includes secession petitions.

A petition to allow Texas to secede from the United States has qualified to receive a White House response, garnering more than 81,000 signatures.

Texas and US Flags

The Texas secession movement's leader said President Obama's reelection was a “catalyzing moment" for his group’s efforts "to quit the United States."

Daniel Miller, president of the Texas Nationalist Movement, said:

“I am completely aware that Election Day was a catalyzing moment, but I do not believe that the underpinnings of this are solely about Barack Obama.”

“This cake has been baking for a long time - it’s the Obama administration that put the candles on the cake and lit it for us.”

The Texas secession petition reads:

Given that the state of Texas maintains a balanced budget and is the 15th largest economy in the world, it is practically feasible for Texas to withdraw from the union. To do so would protect it's citizens' standard of living and re-secure their rights and liberties in accordance with the original ideas and beliefs of our founding fathers which are no longer being reflected by the federal government.

Texas Petition

The support for the petition has surged despite Texas Gov. Rick Perry - who has flirted with the secession idea in the past - callng to support the union.

The governor's press secretary, Catherine Frazier, said that Perry "believes in the greatness of our Union and nothing should be done to change it."

Perry does, however, "share the frustrations many Americans have with our federal government."

The Lone Star State is not exactly alone. Residents in more than 40 states have filed secession petitions to the Obama administration's "We the People" site.

Though none of the breakaway efforts have come even close to Texas' huge number, many petitions have attracted 20,000-30,000 signatures.

Do you want your state to secede from the union?

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